Words of the Week 30/2016 – Thomas Mann


Words of the Week 30/2016

Thomas Mann

Paul Thomas Mann (6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and the 1929 Nobel Prize in Literature laureate. His highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas are noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche and Schopenhauer.

Mann was a member of the Hanseatic Mann family and portrayed his family and class in his first novel, Buddenbrooks. His older brother was the radical writer Heinrich Mann and three of his six children, Erika Mann, Klaus Mann and Golo Mann, also became important German writers. When Hitler came to power in 1933, Mann fled to Switzerland. When World War II broke out in 1939, he moved to the United States, returning to Switzerland in 1952. Thomas Mann is one of the best-known exponents of the so-called Exilliteratur, literature written in German by those who opposed or fled the Hitler regime.

 Words of the Week 30_2016

About tfrsecretary

Born in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany in 1957, I was educated at a Baccalaureate High School. Later completed Technical University with a degree in Economic Informatics. I served for 12 years in the German Army before joining a French computer company for another 10 years. Then ran my own motorcycle and gastronomy businesses before deciding to retire. I arrived in North Cyprus with my second wife in 2004 and since her sad loss in 2011, I have kept myself very busy trying to help others with similar problems and in 2012 became the Secretary of “The Foreign Residents in the TRNC” (TFR). I am very keen to see expat communities coming together and playing their part in helping North Cyprus, our adopted homeland.
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